How To Get A Good Night’s Sleep…

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How Blocking Blue Light at Night Can Help Transform Your Sleep

Dr Mercola | DrMercola.com

good sleep

Do you get the recommended eight hours of uninterrupted, restful sleep every night? Many don’t, and in my experience, if you’re not sleeping well, it’s virtually impossible to stay healthy and emotionally balanced.

Over the long term, skimping on sleep can contribute to a whole host of chronic health problems, from obesity and diabetes to immune problems and an increased risk for cancer. Additionally, it raises your risk of accidents and occupational errors.

Prior to light bulbs, people slept an average of 10 hours a night. Nowadays, the average American gets less than seven hours of shut-eye. Why is that? As noted by Authority Nutrition:1

“It turns out that perhaps the single biggest contributor to our collective sleep problems is the use of artificial lighting and electronics at night. These devices emit light of a blue wavelength, which tricks our brains into thinking that it is daytime.”

A related part of this problem is the fact that most people work indoors and fail to get sufficient exposure to full, bright, and natural sunlight during the day. This disconnect from the natural cycles of day and night can turn into a chronic problem where you’re constantly struggling to fall asleep and stay asleep.

Fortunately the remedy is both simple and inexpensive, as all you have to do is modify your light environment to resynchronize your body to the natural cycles of light and dark.

Step 1: To Sleep Well, Get Bright Light Exposure During the Day

Light intensity is measured in lux units, and on any given day, the outdoor lux units will be around 100,000 at noon. Indoors, the typical average is somewhere between 100 to 2,000 lux units — some two orders of magnitude less.

So when you spend all or a majority of your day indoors, you essentially enter a state of “light deficiency.” The reason why light intensity is important is because it serves as the major synchronizer of your master body clock, which is composed of a group of cells in your brain called the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN).

These nuclei synchronize to the light-dark cycle of your environment when certain wavelengths of light enter your eyes. You also have other biological clocks throughout your body, and those clocks in turn synchronize to your master clock.

So, if you want to get good sleep, you have to have properly aligned circadian rhythms, and step No. 1 is to make sure you get a sufficient dose of READ MORE: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/05/05/blocking-blue-light.aspx

Natalia PH

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Natalia PH